Watch Delta Aquarid meteor shower live right now!

Posted on Jul 28 2014 - 11:23pm by Mark Labbe

There are two amazing meteor showers happening this week, and one is happening right now!

The Delta Aquarid meteor shower is currently going on tonight (Monday, July 28), and it’s a big one! Astronomers are expecting upwards of 20 shooting stars an hour, making it perfect for viewing. Although scientists are still not entirely sure which comet is creating all the debris that causes the meteor shower, they do know that the best time to see it is after midnight.

Meteor shower Slooh space telescope shooting star

The meteor shower can be seen with the naked eye. For best results, try to away from bright city lights and search for an empty field, where the skyline won’t be blocked. If viewing the sky from the Northern Hemisphere, the Delta Aquarid meteor shower will appear from the south, while the Perseid meteor shower will be in the north or northeastern portion of the sky.

However, if finding such a perfect spot isn’t possible, the Slooh Space Telescope currently has a live feed going on of the Delta Aquarid meteor shower. The feed is being broadcast from the Canary Islands, and will be showing the sky through the eye of the Slooh Pace Telescope. By using super-senisitive, low-light equipment, Slooh hopes to give viewers a perfect way to see the meteor shower.

If you happen to miss the Delta Aquarid meteor shower, don’t worry – the annual Perseid meteor shower will be visible this week. Although it won’t peak until August 12 or August 13, the Perseid meteor shower can still be seen this week, astronomers have said. When it does peak, however, it can have as many as 100 shooting stars whizzing by every hour.

So, if you want to see some awesome meteor showers, get outside now or another night within the next two weeks. Or, for those of you who want to stay inside, feel free to check out the live broadcast from the Slooh Space Telescope.

  • Idaho astro

    20 meteors per hour hardly constitutes a “big one.” That’s scarcely higher than the rate of sporadic meteors on any given night. Big annual showers (like the Geminids in December) typically produce six times as many (not to mention what meteor storms, like the once-every-33-years Leonid outbursts, which can produce upward of thousands per hour).

  • Jesse4

    In areas with daylight savings time, after 1:00 AM is when they pick up, rather than midnight as the article states.

  • Local Surfer

    It might be nice to mention which direction or area in the sky to look for them. Everything but that was mentioned.

    • dale ruff

      “If viewing the sky from the Northern Hemisphere, the Delta Aquarid meteor shower will appear from the south, while the Perseid meteor shower will be in the north or northeastern portion of the sky.”