According to a report published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology by a consultant medical oncologist of The Royal Marsden NHS Trust in London, Dr. Susana Banerjee, about 70% of professional oncologists suffer from burnouts and stress related to work-life imbalance. The full result of this study was presented at the annual congress of the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) in Madrid, Spain.

It was revealed through a survey of 595 oncologists in 41 European countries that most medical doctors and young oncologists suffer from the daily pressures of everyday work situations, to the detriment of their personal lives. And chief among the factors responsible for the burnouts these young doctors suffer are lack of romantic relationships, work overload, lack of marital spouses or kids, long work hours, and lack of social lives.

Cancer doctors in central Europe showed more symptoms of work burnouts at a staggering 84% and only 54% suffer work-related stresses in northern Europe. 52% showed lack of proper work-life balance among UK oncologists, and 22% respondents in the survey asked for some sort of counseling to manage burnouts. In a male-female analysis, 60% of male doctors or oncologists were found to suffer burnouts in relation to 45% female doctors.

According to Dr. Susana Banerjee, “oncology is an exceptionally rewarding career, but it can be demanding and stressful at times. Oncologists make complex decisions about cancer management, supervise the use of toxic therapies, work long hours, and continually face patients suffering and dying.” And this work situation demands that doctors achieve a balanced work-life situation because “if doctors aren’t feeling good, the quality of care they provide will also suffer.”

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