A new study conducted by a Harvard MBA having a background in molecular biology states that amoxicillin might show positive signs of recovery within an Autism patient. The study was made by John Rodakis, a medical venture capitalist published the report after his son showed signs of recovery while taking in the antibiotics. Rodakis’s son is diagnosed with autism.


Rodakis’s son was prescribed with amoxicillin for treating a strep throat condition. His son was showing signs of a normal child such as being able to maintain healthy eye contact. He also had an improvement in speaking abilities and had a high drive and energy, which his parents had never seen before. He requested that further medical research should be done about it.

At the same time, Rodakis understands that antibiotics may not be the permanent solution to autism. It may have negative side effects. However, studying the antibiotic may help to understand the “core biology” of autism. Also Rodakis says that a large portion of research community is now seeing autism as “something more akin to a metabolic syndrome” and that microorganisms might play a role in the disease.

In a related topic, A new study published on March 25 in the JAMA Psychiatry journal stated that children with Autism are more prone to gastrointestinal problems in their first three years of life. This closely links between gut bacteria and the disease. It was also published in Microbial Ecology in Health Disease.

The research team was led by Michaeline Bresnahan from Columbia University. She told that physicians should note that ASD diagnosed children might suffer more GI problems in their first three years of life than normal developing children.

These developments forms the stage for further development in understanding the mechanism of the disease in a better manner. This also brings in good news for parents whose children are diagnosed with the mental disorder. Parents are advised by Rodakis to notice their child suffering from autism deeply.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.