Google this Friday in a blog post at Google+ listed out ten myths people might have about the Google Glass. Google Glass has been around for the last two years and has received some major software and hardware updates. Beginning last year in August, the Glass or Project Glass has been in the hands of 10,000 developers and enthusiasts across the world.

Google stated, Glass is not something that distracts you from the rest of the world, while it only allows you to go free and no to look down at the screen of your device every-time. Working just like a hands-free Google Glass can perform tasks including sending a text and receiving a call or making one.

While Google has not allowed any face recognizing app for the wearable, the company said, people think that a Glass Explorer takes your photograph or records a video. Quoting it the company stated, ” So next time you’re tempted to ask an Explorer if he’s recording you, ask yourself if you’d be doing the same with your phone. Chances are your answers will be the same.”

[Evolution of Google Glass]

We would not agree as if it is a ‘myth’, Google Glass, which runs on Android, has been successfully rooted to install face-recognizing apps. Even if its not ‘rooted’, an Explorer can still take your pictures by pressing the button or by saying “OK Google, Take a picture,”.

Google Glass, which is still a prototype, is expected to have a final version of it launched this year at Google I/O. Currently it is priced at $1500 and is only for people chosen to be a part of Google Glass Explorer Program.

Google has also partnered with brands including Ray Ban, to produce frames for the people having prescription lenses and the price for it when it to be launched for public in general is expected to be around $300 or $400.

[This post has been edited in the light of errors we had]

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26 Responses

  1. George Macdonald

    high tech glasses, low tech words. the message went missing in translation, but i think there is a video of the process somewhere…?

    Reply
  2. ryan

    this article was computer generated – nobody actually wrote this – either that or this site employs some offshore help

    Reply
  3. George Kafantaris

    If myths are “spoken enough, they can morph into something that resembles fact,” says Google.
    Or as Plato said 2,500 years ago, left unchecked, prevailing false beliefs become truths.

    Reply
  4. DAVID ALAN JONES RIDGE

    Oh, come on now. The Glass ain’t old enough to have developed a myth about them. A history yes but again come on, a mythology? give me a break.3

    Reply
  5. DAVID ALAN JONES RIDGE

    Oh, come on now. The Glass ain’t old enough to have developed a myth about them. A history yes but again come on, a mythology? give me a break.

    Reply
  6. Google Says These 10 Myths You Probably Believe About Google Glass Aren’t … – In The Capital | Pobot – Daily Newspaper

    […] th&#1077 real world &#959r creeps recording everyone around th&#1077m – th&#1077 …Google debunks Google Glass MythsTh&#1077 Westside T&#1072&#406&#1077Google shoots back &#1072t Glass hatersState […]

    Reply
  7. Joe Menn

    I’m sorry, but this reads like it was written by a 3rd grader, and then translated between several languages before it got to English. It’s an unfortunate side effect of the information age that anyone can write an article and it is never given the benefit of an editor’s review.

    Reply
    • Jamie Hacking

      We are sorry for the inconvenience caused. Since this post was made in much of hurry and was published without the consent of the editor, we tend to not to repeat this in future.

      Reply
  8. Craig Smith

    If I’m recording you with my phone, you KNOW you’re being recorded… but the glasses can record surreptitiously. The condescending tone of this article inplies we are all imbeciles.

    Reply
    • Robert Vorthman

      You can easily tell if a Glass user is recording you. They will be staring right at you, with a camera on their face that illuminates when recording, with a transparent display visible from both sides, so you can see what the user is doing.

      How do I know the phone in your shirtpocket isn’t recording me? It does not have a recording indicator. It also has larger storage and battery capacity.

      Reply
      • Craig Smith

        You can easily tell if a Glasshole was recording me…
        he will be the guy waking up on the floor, wondering what just happened to him.

      • Robert Vorthman

        That sounds like a lot more of a hassle than just looking at the person to see if the light is on.

  9. Bud Mellman

    I think this article was out sourced to the nearest overseas help desk. They gotta do something in their spare time.

    Reply
  10. spaceherrier

    This is one of the most unintelligible articles I’ve read in awhile. It doesn’t even go along well with the title.

    Reply
  11. Avid Reader

    How about myth number one – that anyone has a serious problem with G.Glass other than that they RECORD PEOPLE WITHOUT THEIR PERMISSION? Welcome to the age of WWPublic ridicule gone viral.
    All the other putative “problems” people have with them are a smokescreen. I don’t think even Orwell would have predicted that big brother would turn out to be us. And that it was less a political movement and more a clown act.

    Reply
    • Robert Vorthman

      “big brother would turn out to be us”

      Citizens with the ability to record their surroundings is actually the opposite of big brother, and important to ensuring the rights of civilians. This concept is known as sousveillance (undersight), a counter to survelliance (oversight/big brother).

      Reply
  12. KDee

    Grammar please. We have a serious problem with a lack of editing these days. I learned enough of my grammar skills by fifth grade to be able to write a better article than this drivel.

    Reply
    • kathyzjim

      Very much agree with the grammar problem. Some sentences are nothing more than garble.

      Reply
    • The Official Andy ®

      Agreed. I had to read most of this several times to decipher what it was trying to say. Tech can get as high as it wants, but good old fashioned sentence structure, nouns, verbs, punctuation, and adjectives never go out of style.

      Reply
    • Jamie Hacking

      We are sorry for the inconvenience caused. Since this post was made in much of hurry and was published without the consent of the editor, we tend to not to repeat this in future.

      Reply
  13. Steve Jess

    Was this post machine-translated from Chinese? It certainly doesn’t appear to have been written by a native English speaker:

    “The company in a post at Google+ said, there has been a lot of myths around with Google Glass.”

    “While some can’t afford to spend this much of money…”

    Sentences like the above are just awkward, but this next one made no sense to me at all until I read it three times: “People also believe about the Google Glass, as this is the final version, but Google uncover the truth by saying its still a prototype and a lot of improvements are going to come in this device.” Apparently this means, roughly “Some people apparently believe Glass is fully-developed, but Google insists the product is a prototype and is still evolving.” Was that so hard?

    Does anyone edit this blog?

    Reply
    • Jamie Hacking

      We are sorry for the inconvenience caused. Since this post was made in much of hurry and was published without the consent of the editor, we tend to not to repeat this in future.

      Reply
  14. Duh

    That was one of the must unintelligable aticles I’ve ever read.

    Reply
  15. Gary Doan

    Might want to start with the myth that Google Glass is actually a product, when it has never been released and has no launch date.

    Reply

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