Special glasses designed by eSight Corporation now allow some people who have been declared ‘legally blind’ to see pretty clearly. Since an overwhelmingly large percentage of people (85percent) who have been declared legally blind can see to some extent, the vision aids made by this company help them see by strengthening their contrast.

“Their eyes actually perceive more when they look at the screen than they can with their natural eyesight,” Taylor West, the eSight spokesman explains. Not without adding that the device will not help patients who are totally blind because it is designed to operate on a specific family of eye impairments. It can, however, be adjusted to fit the abilities and preferences of the user.

Vision-impaired new mother Kathy Beitz, for example, who is legally blind. She was born with a genetic condition which causes her to have a blind spot blocking the centre field of her vision. That leaves her with only some peripheral sight. Explains Kathy, “I see better in lower lights; and so I use a higher contrast with white on black.”

Because of her condition, she feared she would not be able to see her first born. And she would not have been able to do so, if not for eSight.

“Seeing who he looked like and how significant he actually was,” Beitz says, recalling her 1st glimpse of her son. “He was chubby. He was extremely cute.”

Her older sister Yvonne Felix also suffers from the same problem as her, explaining her willingness to work with eSight.

Felix, an eSight fundraising coordinator, explains, “I’ve been working towards fundraising for the eyewear so that [Beitz wouldn’t have to] go without seeing her first born’s face, and miss out on that experience.”

Dr. Ana Juricic, low-vision specialist, told International News, “Over 85 per cent of individuals who are legally blind have some degree of vision and that is exactly where this technology or several vision aids can assist those men and women.”

“So what we are finding is that there are far more advancements and a lot of it is essentially based on electronic devices that can help strengthen contrast and give magnification at the similar time,” she said.
The revolutionary device manufactured by the company is not yet covered by the OHIP.

About The Author

A freelance writer, eBook author and blogger. A work from home who loves to stay updated with the buzz in the tech world and a self confessed social media freak. Currently works with TheWestsideStory.net

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.