Once largely eradicated diseases like measles, mumps and whooping cough are spreading again in the U.S. According to CDC data there were more than 600 reported cases of measles in the U.S. during the past year. As a result, campaigns for vaccinations have escalated nationwide. In California, lawmakers are trying to ban students from attending government-funded preschools, state colleges and more without proof of vaccination.

The University of California officials recently announced that it will require all the students to get vaccinated for measles, mumps, chicken pox, rubella, tetanus, meningococcus and whopping cough. The officials said that the new policy was in the planning stages for a year and it will be phased in over three years. The plan will go into full effect in 2017. In addition, the UC system will also make it mandatory for students to screen for tuberculosis.

Currently, the UC only requires vaccinations for Hepatitis B, with some colleges having their own additional requirements. Once the new plan is implemented, the students will require meeting the vaccination requirement by the stipulated deadline. Failing to comply with those deadline my put their registration on hold.

Dr. Gina Fleming, medical director for the UC Student Health Insurance Plan, said that exemptions for medical or religious reasons will be allowed.

However, Gov. Jerry Brown is in favor of legislation that would eliminate all exemptions except medical waivers. A new bill would essentially eliminate parents’ choice to seek the personal-belief exemption. All children will be required to be vaccinated, unless a medical condition such as a continuing chemotherapy, prevents them from receiving the vaccines.

The UC system will notify all students joining the fall 2015 intake of the future mandatory vaccination plan. All the students will require following the plan by fall 2016.

The UC official said that the new vaccination plan is in line with the California Department of Public Health recommendations.

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